Why Microsoft Should Never Make a Windows 7 Tablet

27.05.2010

But, when I leave my desk, I still want to be able to check my e-mail, and surf the Web. I want access to my music collection on a device that is light and portable. I want to be able to create, view, and edit files, or add items to my to-do list, and events to my calendar, and I want all of those things to sync seamlessly between my "real" computer, my tablet, and my smartphone.

Windows 7 is great at what it does on my PC, but it is too cumbersome and simply not suited for the tablet world. You might note that the iPad is built on Apple's iPhone mobile OS. The Dell Streak is built on Google's Android mobile OS. HP pulled the plug on the Windows-7 based Slate so it could reengineer it and build it on Palm's WebOS mobile operating system. See the trend?

Tablets and smartphones are more about mobility than computing. That is why tablets and smartphones are built on mobile operating systems rather than just operating systems.

So, Microsoft--, and OneNote, and Communicator for the iPhone, and the iPad, and Android devices, and WebOS devices, and on BlackBerries, and every other way imaginable. But, don't bother building a whole new device or platform to muddy the waters.

If you must enter the tablet platform fray, have the humility to realize that Windows 7--for all its PC glory--is not the way to go. Feel free to adapt the Zune HD, or Windows Phone 7 OS to the tablet market, but recognize that a tablet is more than squeezing a PC into a flat-panel touchscreen form factor.